Facebook deactivation doublespeak

For the last four weeks I’ve had no time for Facebook, although during that period I’ve received numerous wall post and invitation notifications, all of which led to spam links. Actually, I’ve gotten more of this spam than ever before, but I’m not sure whether to attribute it to my inactivity or the continued growth of the service. Nevertheless, it’s become an aggravating distraction, and as a result I’ve been debating [temporarily] deactivating the account. Then I found a strange twist.

In their Help Center, the service explains what happens when you deactivate an account:

facebook deactivation

But when you actually go to deactivate your account, you receive this little note:

facebook deactivation

If you effectively disappear from the Facebook service, how to you suppose your friends can still invite you to events, tag you in photos, or ask you to join groups?

Via osmosis?

MG signing off (to look up the definition of “mutually exclusive” again)

Comments

n.taylor says:

My God…it is true, they are taking over the world.

The Professor says:

They know where you live, what you like to eat and what you like to do when you are alone. The government knows less about you and that’s because they are broke and have no market cap whereas Facebook does …. cut the hard lines the Facebook collective is assimilating us all

jfwells says:

I finally “deactivated” after the article on privacy issues came out in the Wall Street Journal. No matter how many of their privacy features I enlisted, my information was being passed on when my “friends” played their stupid farming mafia games. That won’t do. Sure they still have my previous information in there, but it will become stale pretty quickly.

You are probably all right! *except for Nate of course

[…] Facebook deactivation doublespeak | Michael Gracie […]

I’m about ready to pull the plug. Becoming a reclusive author is sounding more and more appealing.