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Michael Gracie

And the winner of the ‘Clueless Headline of the Week’ Award goes to…

…the New York Times, for A Sense That Wall St.’s Boom Times Are Over.

Have they been hiding in a cave for the last year or what?

Why is The New York Times releasing proprietary readers?

Via (where else) but The New York Times:

Today our beta version of Times Reader for the Mac becomes available. The beta is free for all registered members of NYTimes.com to download and try.

From perusal of the comments, most are none too happy about installing the Microsoft Silverlight plugin in order to make this “reader” work.

Silverlight or no Silverlight, I won’t be installing this application either. I already have a news reader, and it works just fine. Should Marc Andreessen continue the New York Times deathwatch?

UPDATE: The Alley Insider is unimpressed as well.

UPDATE 2: The plugin is a problem anyway.

The Times Timing…Not So Prescient

The New York Times has opened up their pay wall, Times Select, citing the need to embrace search engine traffic and online advertising.

Meanwhile, they’re bleeding to death, and smart folks are calling for a web shakeout.

Next stop? Google buys them, in bankruptcy court?

The Fake Steve Jobs weekend roundup

I was fishing, thereby missing the action….NOT

The New York Times has spoiled the fun.

Fake Steve agrees, noting “people around the world have been robbed of their sense of childlike wonder.”

Mainstream media now rushes in to sponsor FSJ.

Pamela Jones says Dan Lyons is a hypocrite, just in case you “want to sue.”

I can only suspect FSJ will be short on comments from here on out.

Botnets hit the Sunday paper

I can’t help but smile with glee over this…

The issue of zombies and the problems they cause on the networks has hit the New York Times.

No, I am not happy because the New York Times is my favorite paper or anything; my joy comes from the awareness it is providing. Too many people just don’t get it (until the police show up)…

Serry Winkler, a sales representative in Denver, said that she had turned off the network-security software provided by her Internet service provider because it slowed performance to a crawl on her PC, which was running Windows 98. A few months ago four sheriff’s deputies pounded on her apartment door to confiscate the PC, which they said was being used to order goods from Sears with a stolen credit card. The computer, it turned out, had been commandeered by an intruder who was using it remotely.

That’s one way to find out your computer has been hijacked. And while reading the paper isn’t going to fix the problem, at least it might make you aware that one could exist.

UPDATE: Bruce Schneier agrees – popular attention is a good thing.

State of the News Media

Journalism.org recently released their 2005 report on the state of the news media. We have seen a lot of interesting changes taking place in news. Participatory journalism, centering on the blogosphere, has been the main event. But lets not forget the battles Google News has had and is having, The New York Times purchase of About.com, and the number of longtime nightly news anchors calling it quits.

I think this latest report may shed some light on the underlying issues which created some of the events above, as well as what the future holds. While not a quick read, the report can be printed in parts from the index. You can find it here: State of the News Media.

Spamalot Not Too Entertaining

The major news wires, the blogging community, the technology forum community, and everyone else on the planet, has picked up on this story from The New York Times entitled (more…)