Tag: Scientific Anglers

Sharkskin, or Shark Sin?

Guest Commentary by Tom “Lemonade” Teasdale

Scientific Anglers SharkskinIt is no secret that 3M is one of the largest corporations in America today. They make everything from the tape we wrap our holiday gifts with to aerospace polymers used to build stealth fighters. Such a large corporation is ultimately responsible to its shareholders to create value, however, one of their subsidiaries, Scientific Anglers, has crossed the line in its senseless pursuit of profit.

SA has always been a heavy hitter in the fly line and accessory market, and a few years back, as some of you may remember, they introduced a revolutionary new fly line dubbed β€œSharkskin”. Like most of you, I originally loved this fly line – it flew further, floated higher, and mended better than any product before it. I wanted to throw 160-foot casts in a single haul, stack mends in a line that would float like a body in the Hudson.

But ask yourself this, my fly-fishing amigos: At what cost..(insert heart-felt fist pump and single tear down cheek here)..AT WHAT COST?! Faced with this lust, none of us asked where this technology and β€œnew” material came from, and I must now admit that my want for distance combined with perpetually dry tips blinded my conservationist heart.

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Kelly Galloup and I talk meaty flies, new books and lines (and why we wished more women fly-fished)

Ask any of my fishing friends what my favorite fly is and they’ll tell you it’s undoubtedly the Sex Dungeon. Who wouldn’t love a fly with a name like that? What a lot of people still don’t get though…trout love ’em too. Particularly big trout. I’m also known for taking plenty of skunkings, but that’s because most of my casts wind up catching my hat. The inventor of the Sex Dungeon doesn’t have this problem – he’s Kelly Galloup, lifelong fly-fisherman, guide, and proprietor of the Slide Inn on the edges of the Madison River in Cameron, Montana.

Mr. Galloup is well known in fly-fishing circles for his what could be considered unorthodox techniques – huge, articulated flies with tandem hooks, and the use of fast sinking lines in moving water – but he’s probably best known for the “jerk-strip”, whereby the fly is retrieved by jerking the tip of the rod, and line drawn up as the rod tip is moved back towards the fly. The jerk-strip, along with all the rest of Kelly’s heavily researched methodologies, were first described in his 1999 book Modern Streamers for Trophy Trout.

I was walking through the International Sportmen’s Expo right after the show opened, and Kelly decided he’d put me in a headlock (former martial arts practitioner that he is) and drag me over to the loudest part of the convention center available to share his philosophy on fly-fishing as well as spill the beans on the new Scientific Anglers Kelly Galloup Streamer Express and his soon to be released book Modern Streamers 2. What I learned from the thirty-seven minutes to follow was that Kelly Galloup is without question one of the most enthusiastic, open-minded, and downright salt-of-the-earth people participating in the sport of fly-fishing today.

I could have spent the next couple of days hashing out the substance of the interview, parsing the question and answer “guts” of our talk, but the whole bit was just too damn good (and a hell of a lot of fun). Hence, it’s being published here as a first ever podcast. Enjoy.

[audio:http://media.michaelgracie.com/podcasts/KellyGalloupFlyFishingISE2010.mp3]

I’ll add that after we turned off the microphone, Kelly was still talking fishing, and we continued on for at least another ten minutes until I realized I was way late for the next call. I wish I could have stayed.

Kelly Galloup will be at the International Sportsmen’s Expo, Denver, through Sunday, and will continue on to some of the other shows throughout the country. Check the schedule for his appearances here.

And by the way, thanks Kelly! It was as real as it gets.

Editor’s note: Approximately fifteen seconds of the audio doesn’t exactly relate to fly-fishing, but it was about 15F outside; hence we were subconsciously wishing we were sitting on a beach drinking beers. Or at least that’s the best excuse I could come up with.