Tag: sustainable fisheries

Name a fish that is worth killing

This comes out of southeastern Queensland, Australia – the wholesale massacre of a school of breeding-size permit:

That’s one school of trophy size permit (aka snub-nosed dart or oyster crackers) that no longer exists. Local anglers Fisho spoke with say that permit of this size have never been seen before in the Noosa region. It’s likely the fish were part of a spawning aggregation. It goes without saying that if netting like this continues these stand little, if any, chance of developing a sustainable population.

A decade ago I stood on the beach in Los Frailes, fly rod in hand, and watched netters surround a large school of roosterfish while my guide screamed bloody murder and ran to the jeep for his telephoto lens. This permit debacle reminded me of that.

Then I scrolled the comments, finding this from Mr. Frank Hussey:

If fly flickers were aware of this permit fishery you would not be able to get a room in Noosa! Probably worth $500 each to the sport fishery – and they would be released. I think I’ll come up for a look just in case they missed a few.

dorada mexicoI heard the same thing on that sunny day in Baja, and consider the point valid. Both species are near and dear to the hearts of the fly angler, but can a commercial fisher actually make the leap from selling by the pound to selling by the 1/2 day? Surely the profit margin is better, but is there a big enough market?

I reminisce about all the fish I’ve caught and eaten. I can only think of one that is sick fun to take on the fly, goes great on the grill, and is a prolific enough breeder and voracious enough feeder that it probably isn’t going to wind up on the Endangered Species list very soon.

What else is out there, worthy of catching and eating? Or should we be sticking to madcow and fries a side salad?

MG signing off (to ponder what’s for dinner)