Tag: Twitter

Amazing invention news of the day

New York University student Joe Landolina has created a gel that when applied to open wounds immediately stops even heavy bleeding

Interestingly, Veti-Gel doesn’t just stop bleeding but seems to initiate the healing process. “It works in three ways,” says Landolina. “The first way is it works as a tissue adhesive,” he explains. “It actually holds its own pressure onto the wound so you don’t have to do it. Secondly, when it touches the blood, it does something called activating Factor 12.”

This activates fibrin, which is the polymer you need to make a blood clot, explains Landolina. “Finally, it activates platelet cells.” The gel causes these to bind to the fibrin, causing a tight seal. Landolina says the speed at which this process happens is what triggers the healing process. “We don’t have all the testing to back it up yet – but it should allow it to heal faster over time,” he says.

This product will surely fail. Because it doesn’t have a Facebook page.

The real invention everyone should be cheering about today comes out of Silicon Valley. Twitter has been awarded a patent on sending messages to people that don’t actually pay any attention to you (because they are too busy sending their own messages), telling them what you just ate and/or that you just farted.

Now that’s going to change the world!

MG signing off (because extraordinary is and banality isn’t, regardless of how much sarcasm is input into the system)

Unfollow me, please

I have been actively engaged on Twitter for roughly twenty months. During that time I have met some interesting folks, and had some fun. I also learned a lot about people, social interaction, marketing, network complexity, and myself. But no longer.

The experiment is now over

Before detailing the underlying reasoning, I’ll draw the sketch: between consuming RSS feeds – which I do several times a day during the work week – and keeping track of social network updates, it was just too much. In addition, many of the networks give users the ability to syndicate content from one service to the other – as I was connected to many of the same users on multiple networks, a significant amount of the information being delivered was redundant. I couldn’t tell whether my memory was failing or I was experiencing digital déjà vu.

(more…)

Why “social” applications are no longer present on my phone

Yesterday morning I deleted Twitter for Blackberry from my phone. This follows elimination of the Facebook application a few weeks back. I do not have nitpicks against either software – both worked just fine for their intended purpose. I won’t denounce others’ use of this software, or any like it, either. This is a personal choice, based on trial and error, and reason.

When I’m away from my desk I’m usually doing one of the following: fly-fishing, driving, walking the dog, reading, sleeping, eating, or any number of other things that are either escapes from the daily grind or require my utmost concentration (i.e. the fishing). These activities are not particular conducive to mobile phone use in general, let alone receiving and sending updates from social networks.

Further, I originally tested these apps based on recommendation of a friend – one who uses an iPhone. This person’s original premise was it was great to have these social applications available when out. This was particularly the case if and when you were carousing about town and wanted an easy way to let your friends know where you were so they could join you. I hold this person in high regard, but they’ve since moved to a homestead in the middle of nowhere to, uh, be alone. So much for that theory.

Finally, I thank everyone who’s followed or friend-ed me on Twitter and Facebook. I appreciate the fact that you’re interested in what I’m up to, but I don’t think you want (or need) to know what I’m doing every moment of the day.

I’m much more interested in what you are doing – and what you have to say – anyway. It’s just that I can’t really listen when I’m behind the wheel.

MG signing off (to shut up and pay attention, except when casting)

Stuff YOU might have missed if YOU have been fly fishing too much – 07/13/09

Technology

  • RSA’s Coviello: Cloud Computing Not Secure Enough [PC World] – Web 2.0 and widgets led to the cloud computing craze, so it’s no wonder security wasn’t part of the deal. Nonetheless, while RSA has a clear vested interest in pitching more secure web apps, I’m in complete agreement with Mr. Coviello. Only I don’t think RSA will be the sole innovator in the space.
  • Are You Helping Facebook Outrank You For Your Brand Name? [search engine land] – Get lots of attention over at a site you don’t control, and lose control of your brand in the process.
  • How to Ease Your Transition to Google Voice [LifeHacker] – The dial once, ring everywhere service formerly known as Grand Central is getting aggressive with invitations (even I got one), but I think Google really needs to add the ability to port numbers before it really takes off. PS: I heard Google is using the voicemail service to perfect it’s own text-to-speech services. Is that true?
  • Flickr adds direct-to-Twitter publishing [VentureBeat] – Now playing on Flickr, a way to automatically tweet your photos as you post them. This geek couldn’t figure out if the service would tweet all your photos or whether it could be done on a selective basis, but he couldn’t figure out how to link his Twitter account with his Flickr account either. Then he bailed on the idea altogether.
  • Finance

  • What’s North Dakota’s Secret? [Forbes] – North Dakota had twice the growth of the any other state in 2008, except Wyoming, which it still handily trounced. It presently has the lowest unemployment in the nation, and the 20th ranked GDP per capita. And a budget surplus. Huh?
  • U.S. Home Prices to Fall Through 2011’s First Quarter [Bloomberg] – Unemployment becomes the next leg in the foreclosure boom, and more than half of the major cities in the US are expected to see falling prices for the next two years.
  • The Rental Market Stinks Too [The Atlantic] – While some thought rising foreclosures would lead to rising rental prices as former homeowners mortgagees bailed, the opposite has happened in many places.
  • Mean Street: California IOUs and the Great American IOU Market [WSJ Deal Journal] – Banks won’t take them, and recipients have to eat. The SEC is coming to the rescue, declaring California’s funny money a municipal security and hoping a regulated market will arise for their trade. I wonder if anyone will be allowed to short them.
  • Fly Fishing

    Give yourself a break, will ya’?

    Adieu.

    Stuff I saved in my feed reader for the last ten days – 06/15/09

    Technology

  • Uh…Twitter something. [Everyone]*
  • Let’s see…Facebook this and that? [Everyone]*
  • *Editor’s note: we’re now actively filtering out all news related to Twitter and Facebook for efficiency’s sake – the above mentioned groundbreaking highlights were garnered through inference.

    Finance

  • America: Now $8-to-$14 Trillion Poorer [Reason] – It’s very hard for some of us to feel any poorer, but by golly we’re trying.
  • Unemployment at 10% to Depress Consumer Spending, Survey Shows [Bloomberg] – To figure out how to get paid to do surveys that give the same result as that learned in Economics 101 is the real trick to survival.
  • Court Docs Reveal Govt. Likely Forced Chrysler Deal With Minimal Knowledge of Fiat [NewsBusters] – Heck, the government probably forced Merrill Lynch on Bank of America too, so quit the bitching.
  • Fly Fishing

  • England Takes World Fly Fishing Championships [MidCurrent] – Congratulations to Team England. And in other news, the PMs decided this was a good reason to buy all new gear for themselves and bill British taxpayers.
  • To Save Fish, Defeat Them Quickly [Fly Talk] – What the fast-action graphite wielding contingent knew all along.
  • Dress for success applies directly to fly-fishermen [Durango Herald] – Proving once and for all that looking good really does matter.
  • MG signing off (to clean out the rest)

    News you probably can’t use – 4/30/09

      Technology

    • Apple to introduce more affordable Macs – it’s always those pesky ‘sources’ you have to wonder about. Unless Apple drops their prices by 50% or more (and without handicapping existing systems), I don’t think they are going to make any significant market share gains in this economic environment.
    • Another phishing scam hit Facebook – I’d like to worry about the phishing issue, but I’m not on Facebook. No…I’m more worried about the catfish noodlers depicted in the news encroaching on my territory.
    • Twitter’s reach is limited – It’s part of the meme that Twitter can’t keep users on board. Part of this may result from Twitter syntax (i.e. direct message versus replies versus retweets) being a little tough to grasp, or it may just be that Oprah hasn’t started pumping the service full of feel-good self-helpedness yet.
    • Finance

    • Comcast is cranking up the cash flow – And I’ll tell you how. My Comcast internet is down today, and when I called tech support they offered to send support out. Great…except they also said it’ll cost me $27, unless I want to pay money for ‘service assurance.’ So I’m supposed to a monthly rate for broadband, and pay extra to keep the service up? The moment I mentioned pro-rating my bill for all the time service is down, the tone changed.
    • Chrysler is headed for bankruptcy – Last minute negotiations with creditors don’t pan out, but thankfully the government sweetener (i.e. more taxpayer dollars) doesn’t pan out either.
    • Continuing US jobless claims at fresh record high – The meme tossed around here is that things are turning around because new claims for unemployment have slowed. Can’t go into the numerous factors that may have caused that, because I hardly trust the government estimates to begin with. What I can say is that the powers that be have a lot of motivation to convince you to spend, even if it does mean stretching the truth.
    • Fly Fishing

    • California Legislator Wants Striped Bass Eradicated – The striped bass are always in trouble, particular on the East Coast. But hearing that a Californian doesn’t give a damn about protecting wildlife is just too much.
    • If you teach a man to bonefish – Well he might still go a little hungry (I’m not sure how tasty bonefish are but I have heard they’re edible). But he will have a hell of a lot of fun.
    • What…three tidbits on technology and finance, and only two on fly fishing? Yep, I think you’ve had enough this month already.

    MG signing off (to find some news you can actually use)

    Social Media “Experts” are the Cancer of Twitter (and Must Be Stopped)

    Read before you pay the tuition for “Twitter School”

    Michael Pinto sayeth (emphasis mine):

    Nearly a day goes by on Twitter without yet another social media “expert” choosing to stalk me. At first it started innocently — back in the day (about a year ago) various techie friends started to declare themselves social media gurus because they decided to hang out on Twitter and Facebook all day. And now an army of their offspring monitor Summize in search of human flesh.

    That about covers it. I also believe “social media marketing” is a burned out phrase, and if these folks really had expertise they’d have come up with something better by now.

    Technology Quote of the Month

    So far, but hard to beat

    Steven Hodson on communication technology utilization:

    Communication is a great thing but over-communication I think can also be a detriment. We seem to want to spend so much time talking about literally nothing in order it seems to justify our use of these tools. Communication tools are meant to enhance our lives and our work but it seems that they have become more of a means to lose ourselves in the mundane instead.

    I don’t think it’s all justification of use – some of it is trying to lead by example so the “mainstream” will learn and adopt. Meanwhile, the mainstream is still figuring out how to make this month’s mortgage payment.

    Best weekend reading I didn’t do

    Let’s be honest – if you read beyond the catchy headlines you’d never get the grass mowed

    Twitter Leads Social Networks in Downtime [but quit your whining anyway]

    Josh Catone:

    A new report from Royal Pingdom reveals that Twitter unsurprisingly led social networks in downtime for the first four months of 2008 with a total of 37 hours and 16 minutes. The good news is that even with all that downtime, that’s still a 98.72% uptime percentage for the first third of the year — which isn’t terrible. Can we really complain about a free service thats “only” up nearly 99% of the time?

    No, you can’t.

    Folks will use any and all outliers (i.e. a world without twittering Steve Job’s keynote is like a world without bread and water) to justify the need for 100% uptime, even though whatever downtime they do experience will probably never exceed the (self-proclaimed) utility garnered from using the service, and even though just two years ago Twitter’s downtime was roughly 100%.

    I don’t even use the service, but I still find the whining extraordinarily unjustified.